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Welcome to the Winter Meeting for the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP)! The 2017 theme is Strengthening Ties Between Observations and User Communities. The theme is based on one of the goals in the 2015 - 2020 ESIP Strategic Plan, which provides a framework for ESIP’s activities over the next three years. 

For complete events details ->  2017 Winter Meeting Guide | Poster Gallery
Wireless: Marriott_Conference  | Password: earthscience 


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Monday, January 9
 

8:30am

NOAA EDM Workshop - Day 1
All details can be found here: https://nosc.noaa.gov/EDMW_2017/EDM_2017_Home.html

The theme of the 2017 NOAA Environmental Data Management Workshop is "Making NOAA's Data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable for Societal Benefit." 
The Purpose of the workshop is to build on past work in environmental data management at NOAA by highlighting progress, identifying issues, fostering discussions, and determining where new technologies can be applied. All NOAA employees and contractors are welcome, including data producers, data managers, metadata developers, archivists, researchers, grant issuers, policy developers, program managers, and others. EDMW is expected to include an Opening Plenary, concurrent Breakout Sessions, a session of fast-paced Ignite Talks, and a Closing Plenary.

When is it?
  • Day 1  Monday, January 9, 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Goals & Outcomes:
  • Promote and socialize the concept of data management as a core NOAA business practice.
  • Support the implementation and tracking of Environmental Data Management Committee (EDMC).
  • Promote cross-NOAA collaboration in environmental data management.
  • Provide an opportunity for broader community interactions by fostering Communities of Practice.
  • Identify and document best practices in environmental data management.
  • Identify current capabilities that can be leveraged across NOAA.



Monday January 9, 2017 8:30am - 5:00pm
Bethesda Mariott 5151 Pooks Hill Road Bethesda, Maryland 20814
 
Tuesday, January 10
 

8:30am

NOAA EDM Workshop - Day 2
All details can be found here: https://nosc.noaa.gov/EDMW_2017/EDM_2017_Home.html

The theme of the 2017 NOAA Environmental Data Management Workshop is "Making NOAA's Data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable for Societal Benefit." 
The Purpose of the workshop is to build on past work in environmental data management at NOAA by highlighting progress, identifying issues, fostering discussions, and determining where new technologies can be applied. All NOAA employees and contractors are welcome, including data producers, data managers, metadata developers, archivists, researchers, grant issuers, policy developers, program managers, and others. EDMW is expected to include an Opening Plenary, concurrent Breakout Sessions, a session of fast-paced Ignite Talks, and a Closing Plenary.

When is it?
  • Day 2  Tuesday, January 10, 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM

Goals & Outcomes:
  • Promote and socialize the concept of data management as a core NOAA business practice.
  • Support the implementation and tracking of Environmental Data Management Committee (EDMC).
  • Promote cross-NOAA collaboration in environmental data management.
  • Provide an opportunity for broader community interactions by fostering Communities of Practice.
  • Identify and document best practices in environmental data management.
  • Identify current capabilities that can be leveraged across NOAA.



Tuesday January 10, 2017 8:30am - 5:00pm
Bethesda Mariott 5151 Pooks Hill Road Bethesda, Maryland 20814

9:00am

Pre-ESIP GeoSemantics Symposium

The ESIP Semantic Technologies Committee will be hosting a one day GeoSemantics Symposium. The event will be held at Bethesda North Marriott (the same location as the ESIP meeting) with the intention to bring together the geoscience community interest in Semantic Web, and more broadly Semantic Technologies, to discuss potential collaborations, reuse, and road mapping. We’d like to fully leverage all of the semantic work happening in our respective communities, avoid duplication of effort, and work towards a broad community-endorsed path forward.

We seek broad community input and encourage non-ESIP members and members of other professional societies to attend. The event itself is free; however, attendees will be responsible for providing their own travel and lodging. The exact room within the Marriott is still being worked out and will be provided in future announcements. Also, suggestions for topics to be covered are welcome.


Conveners

Tuesday January 10, 2017 9:00am - 5:00pm
Brookside

3:00pm

ESIP Meeting Registration - Soft Open
Tuesday January 10, 2017 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Registration A
 
Wednesday, January 11
 

7:30am

Registration Opens; Continental Breakfast
Wednesday January 11, 2017 7:30am - 8:00am
Registration A

8:00am

ESIP Meeting Welcome
This session will be streamed live and recorded on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chnE4BWt7c4

Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP


Wednesday January 11, 2017 8:00am - 8:30am
Salon E

8:30am

Amber Case, MIT
This session will be streamed live and recorded on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chnE4BWt7c4

Speakers
avatar for Amber Case

Amber Case

Research Fellow, MIT
Amber Case is a Research Fellow, MIT Media Lab/Center for Future Civic Media. She studies the interaction between humans and computers and how our relationship with information is changing the way cultures think, act, and understand their worlds. Case is currently a fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society and a research fellow at the MIT Center for Future Civic Media. Case is the author of Calm... Read More →

Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016


Wednesday January 11, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Salon E

9:10am

Christa Hasenkopf, OpenAQ
This session will be streamed live and recorded on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chnE4BWt7c4

Speakers
CH

Christa Hasenkopf

CEO/Co-Founder, OpenAQ
Christa Hasenkopf is an atmospheric scientist, passionate about fighting air inequality across the world. She loves starting up environmental open data projects that give the public data, insights and voices they previously did not have. Hasenkopf is co-founder and CEO of OpenAQ, the world's first real-time open air quality data platform, created by an open-source community of scientists, software developers, journalists, and lovers of open data... Read More →

Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016


Wednesday January 11, 2017 9:10am - 9:50am
Salon E

9:50am

Frank Niepold, NOAA
This session will be streamed live and recorded on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chnE4BWt7c4

Speakers
FN

Frank Niepold

Climate Education Coordinator, NOAA
Frank Niepold is the Climate Education Coordinator at NOAA's Climate Program Office in Silver Spring Maryland, Climate.gov Education section lead, a co-chair of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's  Education Interagency Working Group, the U.S. Climate Action Report Education, Training, and Outreach chapter lead, and a member of the Federal Steering Committee for the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4). At NOAA, he develops... Read More →

Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016


Wednesday January 11, 2017 9:50am - 10:30am
Salon E

10:30am

Coffee Break
Wednesday January 11, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Foyer F-H

11:00am

Connecting Data Provider and Disaster Response User Communities - Panel
Speakers
CA

Christoph Aubrecht

Seconded to the World Bank as Senior Geospatial Specialist, World Bank/ESA
Christoph Aubrecht is affiliated with the European Space Agency (ESA), representing ESA at the World Bank to coordinate collaborative activities. Prior to joining ESA, Chris was leading the spatial analytics efforts under the World Bank’s Central America & Caribbean CDRP initiative. For more than 10 years Chris also worked at the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, most recently serving as senior advisor on geospatial strategy... Read More →
KH

Kari Hicks

Duke Energy
Kari Hicks is currently working as a GIS Data Analyst at Duke Energy, with over 5 years of experiencing working in both the academic and commercial fields of GIS. She worked as an Associate Instructor of GIS and Remote Sensing at Indiana University. She also served as a research assistant on a project that used GIS, Remote Sensing, and statistical analysis to explore the relationship between labor sharing activities and agricultural productivity... Read More →
FL

Francis Lindsay

NASA
Dr. Lindsay currently works as a systems engineer supporting NASA’s Earth Science Data and Information System Project.  Dr. Lindsay joined NASA in 2003 as a Program Manager for the Data System Program at NASA HQ helping to initiate the ACCESS Program.  In 2009 Dr. Lindsay first joined the ESDIS Project supporting NASA’s data systems efforts with the Committee of Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) and data system evolution... Read More →
WM

Wally Mealiea

Manager, Business Continuity, Edison Electric Institute
Wally Mealiea joined Edison Electric Institute in November 1996 and serves in the Energy Delivery Group as Manager, Business Continuity. In this role, supports EEI’s initiatives, programs, and policies to improve the industry’s response to major outages and maintain business operations. This includes EEI’s National Response Event framework, the Spare Transformer Equipment Program, the industry’s transformer... Read More →

Conveners
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP


Wednesday January 11, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Salon E

12:30pm

Lunch & Peer Recognition
ESIP Partner of the Year
This award is to honor an ESIP member organization that best exemplifies the spirit of ESIP in one or more areas, through the sharing of a success story. This award will be given annually at the Winter Meeting. The member organization will receive a plaque.

ESIP Catalyst Award
The ESIP Catalyst Award honors individuals who have catalyzed action and inspired others to take action. This award is given annually at the ESIP Winter Meeting.

ESIP President’s Award
This award honors individuals who have made significant contributions to ESIP in the previous year. This award is given annually at the ESIP Winter Meeting. 

Martha Maiden Lifetime Achievement Award for Service to the Earth Science Information Community

This award is named for Martha E. Maiden, now retired NASA Program Executive for Earth Data Systems. Ms. Maiden is widely credited for nurturing ESIP in its infancy and has overseen its growth and maturity. In honor of Ms. Maiden’s leadership, dedication and tireless efforts to nurture ESIP into a vibrant and mature organization, this award was established in 2009 to recognize outstanding service to the Earth science information community. The award honors individuals who have demonstrated leadership, dedication and a collaborative spirit in advancing the field of Earth Science information.



 


Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016


Wednesday January 11, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon F-H

2:00pm

Architecting for the Cloud: Best Practices and Cost Analysis

Architecting for the Cloud is a non-trivial effort.  It is a multi-faceted process. While commercial and Private clouds have been around for over a decade, cost is still the key factor inhibiting cloud adoption.  While countless studies have been published over the years, estimating the Total Cost of Ownership is still a domain-specific effort. This session invites presentations focusing on sharing their experiences, best practices, cost analysis conducted by organizations, missions, and projects.  Some of the potential areas of interests

  • Public, Private, Hybrid Cloud Strategies
  • Vendor Evaluation and Selection
  • Data Movement and Storage Strategies
  • Availability and Redundancy
  • Portability vs Proprietary Solutions
  • Evolution (incremental) vs Revolution (redesign)
  • Instances Types Selection
  • Speed vs Cost
  • Long-term Storage and Availability
  • Cost Saving in Proprietary Solution
  • Tools and/or Process to estimate Total Cost of Ownership

Speakers

  • Dan Pilone/E84 – ESDIS Cloud Architecture and Deployment
  • Mike Little/ESTO – AIST Managed Cloud Environment
  • Aleksandar Jelenak – OPeNDAP on Cloud
  • Hook Hua/JPL – Science Data Systems


Wednesday January 11, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
White Flint Amphitheater

2:00pm

Interdisciplinary Approaches to User-driven Exploratory Search and Interactive Data Analytics
Organizations from across academia, government and the commercial sector have realized for some time, the intrinsic value in the provision of user-driven search and data analysis. Information retrieval techniques operating on text or semantic annotations, have become the industry standard for retrieval from large data collections, such as documents, images, videos, music, medical data, etc. Implementations associated with such techniques work well with sufficient volumes of high-quality meta-data or tagging however it has become obvious that the use of subject matter expert (SME) tagging services simply does not scale with today’s (and future) projected data volumes. This is particularly evident within the Earth Sciences domain where SME’s are constantly in high demand and oversubscribed. This combined with the sheer volume of data belonging to ever growing datasets means that our community must move towards more adaptive intelligent mechanisms for ensuring current search and data analysis requirements are addressed.

A growing recognition exists that a solution to this problem involves active engagement of the user (on several levels) in the overarching, multifaceted search and analysis workflows which comprise of information retrieval, exploratory search and interactive data analytics. Thus the goal is to enable users to not only explore given dataset(s) more easily but also gradually direct their search to a more specific area of the search space.

The aim of this session is to explore new methods and interface/system design for interactive data analytics, user-driven exploratory search, search customization and related management in various domains, including specialized scientific collections e.g. datasets, virtual collections, scientific literature as well as for various tasks, such as semantic information retrieval, conceptual organization and clustering of data collections for sense making, semantic expert profiling, and document/multimedia recommender systems. The primary audience of the session are researchers and practitioners in the area of interactive and personalized system design possibly relating to data management and systems technologies, data archival and stewardship and/or new search paradigms as applied to the Earth Sciences who are interested in discussing these topics in a multidisciplinary setting.
 
Session Target Areas
 
The workshop invites submissions in all areas of interactive data analytics and exploratory search including:
- design, testing and assessment of interactive systems for data analytics
- interactive data visualization for exploratory and investigative analysis
- interactive classification and clustering of data
- user assisted curation and validation of the analysis process, and generation of data visualizations
- user engagement in the semantic analysis process via suitable annotation and correction tools
- study of the trade-off between accuracy of the results and user effort
- personalization and user modeling related to interactive system design
- user tagging
- provision of user-specific content
- interactive user feedback
- mining logs (HTTP, FTP, etc.)
- recommendation systems
- expert based rule systems 

Submissions aimed at discussing or solving practical problems from within the Earth Sciences are especially welcome.
 
We encourage submissions of work in progress, concepts, case studies, and generally material that will stimulate discussion, generate useful feedback to the authors, encourage research collaborations and vigorous exchange of ideas on promising research directions.

Conveners
avatar for Lewis McGibbney

Lewis McGibbney

DAAC Engineer, PO.DAAC
My name is Lewis John McGibbney, I am currently a Data Scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California where I work in Computer Science and Data Intensive Applications. I enjoy floating up and down the tide of technologies @TheASF having a real enthusiasm for Web Search and Information Retrieval in particular. You'll find me on lists including Nutch, Gora, Any23, OODT, Open Climate Workbench, Tika, Usergrid and a number of... Read More →


Wednesday January 11, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Glen Echo

2:00pm

Near Real Time Data for the Disasters Response User Community
Following the NASA workshop on low-latency data products held in Sep 2016 at NASA Langley, more detailed information is needed to understand the timeline driving the decision makers in response to a disaster. The question is ‘what data is needed when and for whom’ so that data providers can be better prepared to supply the data products in a timely fashion. This session is planned to address decision-making data needs throughout a sample disaster event, such as Hurricane Matthew. The goal is to determine a timeline of data needs aligned with decisions that must be made from the earliest awareness of a disaster for incident planning and management, emergency and resource management, through to relief and recovery management. Such a timeline will help data providers design methods to assure that routine data and data products are readily discoverable and useable by identified users at specified times. Additionally, specific data must be requested (e.g., from other agencies) or tasked (e.g., from available satellites) such that they are available when needed, for example the media needs information at specific times for updates to inform the public. These non-routine products need to be collected and processed at key times by data providers and potentially some end users. National, regional and local organizations are expected to have their own timelines based on the communities and information needs they serve. 


Wednesday January 11, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Salon E

2:00pm

Sustainability Roundtable: A discussion of current approaches for Open Science software

The question of achieving sustainable funding for research/science software is an active topic of concern. Many of us are familiar with the anecdotal stories of successful (or not) community engagement and funding diversification in open source software projects; in this session, we're opening up the floor to for folks to share success stories, not-quite-success stories and current approaches and concerns in sustainable software across project size and type. We'll start the session with informal lightning talks, getting at the following:

  1. Brief description of software project (size, community, aims)
  2. Community engagement efforts (what worked? What didn't?)
    1. As your project evolved, did this change?
  3. Funding diversification efforts (what worked? What didn't?)
    1. As your project evolved, did this change?
  4. What options for alternative (non-federal agency) funding are you considering?
  5. Wildest idea you and your research group has ever had for alternative funding?

As we consider the activities, through governance, community engagement and funding approaches, we can start to understand what guidance we can provide, for managing projects over a long lifecycle and for addressing requirements in sustainability plans, and where we find gaps to support data-driven feedback in those areas.


Conveners

Wednesday January 11, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Oakley

2:00pm

What Does Documentation Mean to You: 2017 Documentation Cluster Theme and Goals

Documentation means many things to many people. This informal session will include a discussion on what documentation means to the cluster, on the topics the documentation cluster is interested in covering in 2017 and setting a new theme for 2017. As new co-chairs, we also welcome the chance to meet documentation cluster members in person!

 



Wednesday January 11, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Linden Oak

2:00pm

Your Leadership in Earth Science
Whether you are currently leading an ESIP cluster or committee, or you are leading a project in your member organization, or you are simply interested in learning more about what leadership looks like in our field - this session is for you.  We’ll be speaking with a panel of Earth Science leaders who have diverse leadership styles, hearing their stories of how they grew into their current opportunities, the challenges they faced along the way and face now, and their thoughts on how to grow one’s own and team leadership capabilities.
 
We invite you to join in the discussion or just come to listen; we hope you will be encouraged in the skills you already have and inspired by the new ideas too!


Wednesday January 11, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Forest Glen

3:30pm

Coffee Break
Wednesday January 11, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

4:00pm

Data Driven Decision Making for the Disasters Response User Community
The Disaster Life Cycle Cluster 2016 activities to better understand end user needs for satellite and related data products has resulted in lessons learned in key communities including the State of California (e.g., earthquake response) and utilities managers (e.g., mass power outage response). This session will recap key findings from the ESIP-sponsored Oct 27, 2016 Data Driven Decision Making (3DM) workshop in DC.  An update on the Fleet Response Working Group (FRWG) Testbed is planned to show examples for Hurricane Matthew use case. We also will see how the UAH Event Album is updated based on examples from Hurricane Matthew.  We will examine approaches to identifying Trusted Data criteria relevant to needs of the disasters response and risk management communities. Following the Cascadia Rising Exercise in the summer and the Vigilant Guard 17 Exercise in the fall, we will get an update on the use of near real time and other data sets by partners in California. Next steps for additional 3DM workshops and webinars will be discussed to continue building relationships with user communities, including follow on efforts with the utility sector.


Wednesday January 11, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Salon E

4:00pm

Demonstration of Selected Usability Evaluation Techniques for Data Repositories' Interfaces/Services
Over the past few months, the ESIP Usability Cluster has been exploring usability principles and discussing how User Interface (UI)/ User Experience (UX) evaluation techniques can be employed to enhance Earth science data repositories. The Usability Cluster would like to host a session at the ESIP Winter Meeting demonstrating three different UI/UX evaluation techniques: cognitive walkthrough, usability testing, and heuristic evaluation, with respect to real-life data repository interfaces/services. Three different repository interfaces will be evaluated during the session, one for each UI/UX technique, to show that these techniques can yield immediate results without being overly time consuming or burdensome. We will finish with a discussion of how wireframes can be used to communicate evaluation feedback to developers and for additional quick and easy usability testing before implementing any changes to a live system.

Speakers
SH

Sophie Hou

Data Curation and Stewardship Coordinator, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
data management/curation/stewardship: including but not limited to data life cycle, policies, sustainability, education and training, data quality, usability.
DK

Danie Kinkade

WHOI/BCO-DMO

Wednesday January 11, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
White Flint Amphitheater

4:00pm

Harmonizing vocabularies for population studies
Marine Biodiversity Observation Networks (MBONs) will produce measurements of organism occurrences, abundance and density from various ongoing local collections, and from new technologies such as genome sequencing and imagery. From these will be produced complex derived measurements and multiple diversity indices for broad taxonomic groups (“microbes-to-megafauna”). Data must be interoperable with existing environmental measurements and also aligned with Darwin Core and GBIF.  Considerable work has gone into lists of biological terms, e.g., the Essential Biological Variables, the IOOS Biological Core Variables and as part of the GOOS Essential Ocean Variables. However, some aspects of these vocabularies are still at the conceptual level - i.e., they are somewhat ambiguous and without quantities assigned. Concrete descriptions of measurements for population data are needed in all communities studying populations and biodiversity, so additional work on these terms will have broad applicability. Alignment between Darwin Core terms (via OBIS) and some MBON datasets from GCOOS has already begun, which lends urgency to this work.

During this session, we will outline the steps necessary to operationalize important population variables so that they can be attached to measurements in MBON datasets. We anticipate tasks such as specifying definitions or constraints for established variables, and  aligning definitions among various vocabularies. A sample of current tools and capabilities will be briefly outlined, and input from participants’ priorities gathered so that a concrete scope of work can be developed to advance this work.

Background Material:

Recommendations for the Use of Knowledge Organisation Systems by GBIF http://www.gbif.org/resource/80656

Pereira, H. M. et al. 2013. Essential Biodiversity Variables. Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.1229931

GOOS Biology and Ecosystems Panel. http://goosocean.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=79&Ite...

A Framework for Ocean Observing. By the Task Team for an Integrated Framework for Sustained Ocean Observing, UNESCO 2012, IOC/INF-1284 rev., doi: 10.5270/OceanObs09-FOO

IOOS Core Variables http://www.iooc.us/activities/biological-integration-observation-task-team/

GCOOS sample datasets aligned with DC terms via the OBIS enrollment process (see attached doc): http://gcoos4.tamu.edu:8080/erddap/search/index.html?page=1&itemsPerPage...

GBIF-TDWG Vocabulary Management Task Group: http://community.gbif.org/pg/groups/21382/,  http://terms.tdwg.org/wiki/,  http://terms.tdwg.org/wiki/Audubon_Core 

 
The Ecosystem Ontology (ECSO) of measurements, http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/ECSO/



Conveners
MO

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, Marine Science Institute, UCSB


Wednesday January 11, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Linden Oak

4:00pm

Moving Beyond Mandates: Progress Toward Public Access and What the Future Holds
With the introduction of open government, digital data strategies, and the open data/public access directives initiated in the Obama Administration, Federal agencies have been working towards implementing these new requirements. This has involved enormous effort in the development of policies, processes, tools and outreach in order to present quality data and freely available scholarly publications to the public. Along the way there have been successes and challenges for Federal agencies. As a new Administration takes over, we are in a position to take a look back and think about the future. This session will examine progress made towards achieving public access to open data and scholarly publications, how these activities affect non-government organizations, and explore how these achievements position us to sustain and enhance our responsiveness to these important government initiatives. 

Conveners
VH

Viv Hutchison

Science Data Management Program Manager, US Geological Survey
Data Management!


Wednesday January 11, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Glen Echo

4:00pm

Semantic Community Engagement Plan
We'll discuss how to promote the adoption of semantic technologies by other ESIP and non-ESIP groups. In particular, we will try to develop a plan for promoting use of the new ontology portal. Topics for discussion will include ideas for how to train others in using the portal; how to promote portal use; governance.

Wednesday January 11, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Forest Glen

4:00pm

Sharing ESIP Educational Resources via 10 Minute Webinars & building a Video Library
The rapid pace of technology provides an opportunity for educational updates around new data tools and techniques. ESIP Education will kick-off an initiative in 2017 featuring a series of short webinars showcasing ESIP member resources. Each presentation will be recorded and archived, building a library of data tool vignettes that anyone can access. Content will be geared toward educators teaching grades 7-13. Tentatively called “Out to Lunch” the series will commence in February and be offered every-other week during the school year. Educators will know before logging on that presentations will only last 10 minutes long, with up to 10 minutes Q&A.

This winter meeting session will introduce the series and quickly move into 5 or 6 demos that will become the first to populate the video library.  Here are our initial topics and speakers:

ESIP Education Drone E-book - Debut of "Have a Drone? Try this!", LuAnn Dahlman, NOAA Climate Program Office & Shelley Olds, UNAVCO http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/ESIP_Drone_Activities
Using NOAA's Data in the Classroom for formal education - Dan Pisut, NOAA's Environmental Visualization Lab, http://dataintheclassroom.noaa.gov/
GOES-R Educational WebApps - activities that demonstrate Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) capabilities. Margaret Mooney, CIMSS, http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/webapps
ClimateBits & NEO – tools to explore Earth science concepts easily. Stephanie Schollaert Uz, NASA, https://neo.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/ & http://climatebits.umd.edu/
GPS Velocity Viewer - exploration of geodetic plate velocities. Shelley Olds, UNAVCO, http://www.unavco.org/software/visualization/GPS-Velocity-Viewer/GPS-Vel...
Climate Explorer - Interactive maps and graphs of climate observations and projections through 2100 for every county in the contiguous United States. LuAnn Dahlman, NOAA Climate Program Office, https://toolkit.climate.gov/climate-explorer2/

The session will conclude with a discussion on best practices moving forward and brainstorming future speakers from the ESIP community. We welcome submissions for future talks that will start in February.
Here is our current list:
1) Building classroom data activities with free, easy to use tools from NOAA
2) Solar Eclipse resources
3) CIMSS Climate Data Portal (CDP)
4) Visualizing data via RealEarth, on desktops or mobile devices

Conveners
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
avatar for Shelley Olds

Shelley Olds

Science Education Specialist, UNAVCO
Data visualization tools, drones and STEM, 3-D imaging (structure from motion), human dimensions of natural hazards, disaster risk reduction (DRR), resilience building.


Wednesday January 11, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Oakley

5:30pm

Poster Session & Reception
Please join us on Wednesday, January 11 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. for a poster session and reception. Your name-tag includes a ticket good for one drink of your choice. Posters abstracts are included in this program and can be found on the ESIP Commons (http://commons.esipfed.org/gallery/Winter%20Meeting%202017)

Wednesday January 11, 2017 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Foyer F-H
 
Thursday, January 12
 

7:30am

Registration Opens; Continental Breakfast
Thursday January 12, 2017 7:30am - 8:00am
Registration A

8:00am

2017 Annual ESIP Business Meeting & State of Federation (OPEN to ALL)
The ESIP Assembly will hold its annual meeting in conjunction with the Winter Meeting. 
  1. Call to Order

  2. State of the Federation

    1. President's Report - Emily Law (10 mins)

    2. Staff Report - Erin Robinson (5 mins) 

    3. Committee Reports (30 mins)

      1. Constitution & Bylaws

      2. Finance

      3. Partnership 

      4. Data Stewardship 

      5. Education

      6. Information Technology & Interoperability 

      7. Products & Services 

      8. Semantic Tech 


    4. Sponsor Reports (30 mins)

      1. NASA 

      2. NOAA 

      3. USGS


    5. 2017 Summer Meeting Location - Jen Schopf

    6. Discussion (30 mins)

  3. Resolution to dissolve MOU between Foundation and Federation 

  4. Resolution to merge Foundation and Federation (Merge Plan)
  5. Election of 2017 Leadership - Nominations (5 mins)
  6. Type Caucus (20 mins)

  7. Adjourn


Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016


Thursday January 12, 2017 8:00am - 10:30am
Salon D

10:30am

Coffee Break
Thursday January 12, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Foyer F-H

11:00am

Alex Howard, Sunlight Foundation
This session will be streamed and recoreded here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8Y89dQlreM

Speakers
AH

Alex Howard

Deputy Director, Sunlight Foundation
Alexander B. Howard is the Deputy Director of the Sunlight Foundation. Previously, he was a senior analyst at Sunlight, the first senior editor for technology and society at the Huffington Post, a columnist at TechRepublic and a contributor to TechPresident, among many other publications, a consultant, moderator and researcher. In 2013, he founded e-pluribusbunum.org, a blog focused on open government and technology. Full... Read More →

Conveners

Thursday January 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon E

11:30am

Chris McEntee, AGU
This session will be streamed and recoreded here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8Y89dQlreM

Speakers
CM

Christine McEntee

Executive Director, American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Christine McEntee is Executive Director and CEO of the American Geophysical Union (DC), a worldwide scientific community that advances the understanding of Earth and space through cooperation in research. She is the third Executive Director in AGU’s 92-year history. For more than 25 years she has made her mark as an association leader and innovator, building a steady record of achievement in leading large organizations through... Read More →

Conveners

Thursday January 12, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon E

12:00pm

David Bollier
This session will be streamed and recoreded here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8Y89dQlreM

Speakers
DB

David Bollier

Independent Scholar
David Bollier is an independent American scholar, activist and blogger whose work focuses on the commons as a new paradigm of economics, politics and culture. He pursues this work primarily as co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group, an advocacy/consulting project, and as Director of the Reinventing the Commons Program at the Schumacher Center for a New Economics (US). Bollier has been integrating scholarship, public policy, education and... Read More →

Conveners

Thursday January 12, 2017 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Salon E

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday January 12, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon F-H

2:00pm

CMR Metadata Curation
This session focuses on CMR (Common Metadata Repository) metadata curation activities. Complete, correct and consistent metadata is essential for strengthening ties between data observations and user communities. High quality metadata strengthens these ties by improving discoverability, accessibility and usability. We will also have an interactive portion during this session to discuss what the group considers important for crafting high quality metadata.

Conveners
avatar for Katie Baynes

Katie Baynes

Systems Architect, ESDIS Project


Thursday January 12, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Glen Echo

2:00pm

Data driven, traceable decision-making for climate resilience
The rapid pace of large-scale environmental changes around the globe has underscored the value of long-term data sets for understanding the context of scientific observations, for forecasting future conditions, and making informed decisions on how to adapt to these large-scale challenges.  ESIP’s contributions to White House initiatives (such as the Partnership for Resilience and Preparedness, the Climate Resilience Toolkit, and the Climate Data Initiative) and the emerging All Hazards Consortium’s Data Driven Decision Making (D3M) initiative underscore the importance of making earth science data and information relevant to climate-resilience decisions.  This breakout session will provide an overview of how data, models, and information can be used in the context of Structured Decision Making (SDM) to support such decisions.  We shall also see how a web-based decision-analysis tool initially developed for the EPA was used to evaluate the social, environmental, and economic trade-offs in a stakeholder-driven workshop to inform climate resilient solutions for the community of Dania Beach, FL.  This ESIP session will also examine the application of SDM for watershed and coastal management for the U.S. Interagency Coral Reef Task Force project on Guánica Bay, PR.  This session shall be used to seek input on a draft framework that integrates key concepts from (a) climate resilience and disaster reduction planning, (b) data driven decision making, and (c) Structured Decision Making.  

Speakers
Thursday January 12, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Salon E

2:00pm

Environmental Domain Linked Features and Observations
Google Doc For Session: http://goo.gl/7euaih

Discovery of data related to a place or topic often requires traversal of physical or semantic links that connect the data of interest to the place or topic being studied. This session seeks applications (successful or not) that address this basic concept. A series of presentations describing the systems will be followed by a discussion of their strengths and weaknesses in order to inform future activities in this space.

    Establishing and maintaining indexes of links between domain features (such as waterbodies, ecosystems and cities) that are relevant to decisions and data related to those features is a challenge we all face. There are numerous approaches that could be considered for exposing, discovering, and establishing links between environmental, hydrologic, and related features. Systems in this space tend to have components like a search engine—crawlers that index data sources, an index that can form relationships between indexed data according to relevant queries, and search services that expose indexed information in interesting ways. In the hydrology domain, this would be implemented as a search service that can traverse the river network, where other domains would have their own relevant spatial or other type of index. Recent work to standardize features in the hydrology domain has resulted in HY_Features for surface water, GWML2 for groundwater, and SoilML for soils. The Observations and Measurements standard and others that follow the same pattern of “observing" and “observed" features provides a standardized model to follow but the landscape of systems implemented to leverage this pattern is varied.

    In this session, speakers are invited to present proven methodologies for solving one or more aspects of the problem of linking domain features to each other and to observations such that users can ask questions rooted in their domain. Of special interest are methods and technologies that allow 1) a domain-specific crawler to discover information automatically, 2) an index of related features to be used in domain-relevant queries, and 3) search service APIs and data services that expose search results and data products. The session will take the form of a series of short presentations followed by a facilitated discussion. The outcomes of this session will help inform a planned OGC interoperability experiment working toward formal best practices for such systems.


Thursday January 12, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Linden Oak

2:00pm

Experiences in Science Communication
We can all remember experiences when we shared our research or work, and our message was misunderstood or ignored. The bright side is that communication is a practice, which gives the grace to learn and try again. In this roundtable, we'll talk about our experience when a science communication endeavor was or was not successful, what can be learned, and how that can help each other. Then we will summarize themes and brainstorm on how the ESIP community can help each other have better science communication success. Preparation: Think about an experience to share. If you have written or visual artifacts that accompany it, that's great (but not required) - let us know in advance if you want to show on a screen or have an example printed.

Conveners
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information


Thursday January 12, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Oakley

2:00pm

Information Quality CLuster - Fostering Collaborations

The goals of the Information Quality Cluster (IQC) as expressed in the Strategic Plan are: 1. Bring together people from various disciplines to assess aspects of quality of Earth science data; 2. Establish and publish baseline of standards and best practices for data quality for adoption by inter-agency and international data providers; and 3. Build a framework for consistent capture, harmonization, and presentation of data quality for the purposes of climate change studies, Earth science and applications. Moving towards these goals, the IQC has been collecting and evaluating use cases to help identify issues and analyze them to arrive at recommendations for improvements in capturing, describing, enabling discovery and facilitating use of data quality information. The purpose of this session will be to collaborate with other ESIP clusters whose primary emphasis is on utilization of Earth science data for research and applications. The purpose of the collaboration will be to answer questions such as: What type of quality information is needed for their applications? Are they easy to find? Are they complete and easy to understand? What level of data quality is important for their applications (what can they “get away with”? What improvements should be made in conveying quality information?  
 
A brief introduction will be provided to familiarize new attendees with the IQC. Brief presentations will be made by invited panelists from other ESIP clusters such as the Disaster Lifecycle Cluster and Agriculture and Climate Cluster representing data users’ perspectives, and a panelist from the data provider community. The presentation will be followed by a discussion period to identify gaps and approaches to filling the gaps and addressing issues.

Agenda:

  • Introduction to Information Quality Cluster and Status - David Moroni - 8 minutes
  • Panelist Presentations (Total of 32 minutes)
    • Agriculture and Climate Cluster - Jeff Campbell (USDA) - 8 minutes 
    • Disaster Lifecycle Cluster  - Speaker TBD - 8 mintues
    • CEOS/WGCV Land Product Validation - Pierre Guillevic (U of MD) - 8 minutes
    • Obs4MIPS - Robert Ferraro (JPL) - 8 minutes
  • Discussion - 50 minutes

Conveners
avatar for Ge Peng

Ge Peng

Research Scholar, CICS-NC/NCEI
Dataset-centric scientific data stewardship, data quality management


Thursday January 12, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
White Flint Amphitheater

2:00pm

Unmanned Aerial Systems: Data Linking and Data Fusion

An increasingly wide range of applications for unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in data and Earth sciences has become possible with the miniaturization of powerful sensors and user-friendly flight hardware adopted from the world of model aviation. As tools for collecting innovative remote sensing data and geospatial analysis open doors for researchers, the Drone Cluster is exploring a number of applications for UAS in terms of Earth science research and software/data management approaches.

The goal for this session is to drill down into the innovative and powerful ways of using UAS data as one part of a larger confluence of geospatial datasets in two unique aspects: (1) how the emergence of low-altitude aerial imagery collected by UAS can be linked to satellite data; and (2) what data fusion or integration techniques are possible with the variety of image or monitoring sensors from numerous sources and UAS platforms. We will hear from people working on projects that use UAS within a larger research context to understand how different datasets are being linked, the operational and data processing techniques used to render useful geospatial products, and the challenges presented by data collection and processing via UAS.

This session will frame the use of UAS data by having a variety of speakers give lightning talks on the ways they are using UAS data in and amongst other datasets from multiple sources and in a variety of Earth science contexts, for example natural disasters, forest/biomass monitoring, and agriculture. They will present an overview of their work and the specific techniques employed on their projects. There will be a panel discussion from members of the ESIP community on various data related challenges inherent with integrating UAS into Earth science research, especially with respect to the need of data/metadata standardization, which remains a significant consideration when combining UAS data with other data sources.



Thursday January 12, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Forest Glen

3:30pm

Coffee Break
Thursday January 12, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Foyer F-H

4:00pm

Advancing netCDF-CF
Thursday January 12, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Linden Oak

4:00pm

Earth Science Data Analytics: Practice & Applications

The Earth Science Data Analytics (ESDA) Cluster is in a state of transition, going from the theoretical discussion of "What is Earth Science Data Analytics" to connecting more to the practice and technical barriers and solutions that exist within this realm. The ESDA Cluster is currently working to connect between Earth Scientists and Data Professionals (Data Scientistis, Managers, etc). We have identified within our own ESIP Cluster a serieis of data anlytics challenges within various earth science domains, and will use these (and other solicited challenges) as a launching point to further our Cluster Activities / Discussion during the ESIP Winter Meeting. Managing data the way it is needed to answer a given question and yet be made useful for others

  • Ensuring the data are reproducible.
  • Data sharing
  • Proprietary mindset in data collection / generation: Not knowing how to share data openly: where / what format / how to document / make citable
  • Legacy data: additional problem of missing information, degraded items/information/technology
  • Data Discovery actually locating it can be problematic even if you know data exists
  • Integrating datasets from multiple data providers into a common standard
  • Frequently researchers don't want to spend the time after the research is complete to align the data with a standard.
  • Creating/Developing/Providing data services that enable users efficiently (i.e., properly and quickly) acquiring the data sets they want/need out of the massive Earth Science Data products available in US or/and (literally) everywhere around the World.
  • Making data findable by scientists, across multiple repositories, websites, data assembly centers, etc.
  • Connecting related data: connecting data from the same sample/cruise/project distributed across different repositories, connecting different versions of data and processed products to raw data in a way that the scientists knows what they need to use, connecting data in repositories to publications.

From here, the ESDA Cluster has identified two potential ways of going forward:1. Examining/prototyping technical analytics solutions 2. Soliciting challenges from scientists; Connect Earth Scientists with Data Scientists 

For either perspectives, we will have a series of speakers and challenges identified from the earth science community, by both: use a ‘Calling all Scientists’ to attend the ESDA Session and Solicit Earth Scientist Data usage challenges to accomplish the two goals of this session (1) Make the connections between Earth Scientists with Data Scientists (2) explore technical solutions that may address challenges



Thursday January 12, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Salon E

4:00pm

ESIP-EarthCube Collaboration
The NSF-funded EarthCube program and ESIP have a strong interest in establishing a close partnership between the two organizations. For that main reason, EarthCube became a Type V member in summer 2016. There are significant opportunities to achieve mutual gain by leveraging the expertise of the respective communities, which already have a large overlap in membership, and through synergistic projects and other forms of collaboration.

The collaboration between ESIP and EarthCube will also be key to building consensus on technical standards and ensuring interoperability of distributed geoscience cyberinfrastructure. ESIP has achieved community governance and sustainability over the last nearly 20 years, making it the go-to place for cutting edge Earth and Space Science Informatics (ESSI) discussions and work. EarthCube and ESIP will accrue mutual benefits because it is one way to ensure that the EarthCube systems will align and contribute to work going on in the larger ESSI community, with the best case being the adoption of EarthCube tools by other ESIP partners.

There are a number of other potential areas of collaboration between EarthCube and ESIP, including in the area of testbed activity and assessment framework. ESIP has developed a well-formulated framework for evaluating the technology readiness level of information technologies, tools, and software. As EarthCube moves forward, a key component of the Roadmap implementation is the assessment of funded projects and development of an evaluation framework. EarthCube can leverage ESIP’s framework in evaluating the maturity and readiness level for integration into EarthCube’s cyberinfrastructure and exploit the synergies between the two similar activities.

In summary, we believe that by virtue of working together, ESIP and EarthCube will experience the network effect, enabling a more coordinated cyberinfrastructure across domain-specific communities and benefiting science in ways that we can only imagine. The purpose of this breakout session is to engaged in a focused discussion to establish a closer partnership between ESIP and EarthCube and to explore specific opportunities for collaboration.

Conveners
LP

Lindsay Powers

Program Coordinator, USGS
Data rescue and preservation, research facilities, EarthCube, USGS


Thursday January 12, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Forest Glen

4:00pm

Introduction to the Partnership for Resilience Preparedness (PREP)

The Partnership for Resilience and Preparedness (PREP) is a public-private collaboration to empower a data-driven approach to building climate resilience. PREP aims to help planners, investors, and resource managers more easily incorporate climate risks into their decisions by enhancing access to relevant data and facilitating collective learning through insights on climate change. PREP does this through:
* Engagement 
* Data 
* Platforms

In this session we will introduce PREP through a series of short talks: 

  • Introduce PREP and evolution of CDI
  • Introduce Platform Workgroup w/ focus on platform itself
  • GCIS connection to PREP
  • Introduce Engagement Workgroup   
  • Introduce Data Workgroup

We will then discuss two complimentary efforts: 

  • Global Platforms on Sustainable Cities 
  • Funding opportunities on OGC Testbed 13 - Advancing technologies relevant to science data infrastructure

Speakers
CA

Christoph Aubrecht

Seconded to the World Bank as Senior Geospatial Specialist, World Bank/ESA
Christoph Aubrecht is affiliated with the European Space Agency (ESA), representing ESA at the World Bank to coordinate collaborative activities. Prior to joining ESA, Chris was leading the spatial analytics efforts under the World Bank’s Central America & Caribbean CDRP initiative. For more than 10 years Chris also worked at the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, most recently serving as senior advisor on geospatial strategy... Read More →
avatar for Amrutha Elamparuthy

Amrutha Elamparuthy

Data Manager, USGCRP

Conveners
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP


Thursday January 12, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
White Flint Amphitheater

4:00pm

New platforms and techniques for strengthening ties between observations and user communities

Over the past couple of years research data stewardship platforms and tools have grown substantially. Yet when we say "grown" it may not be quite in the way one might think. Instead of growing larger as a unit, a measurement of growth here is in a systems ability to connect and the perception of relevance and utility of that system to the user communities. In this session we propose to introduce several platforms and initiatives within the research data management realm that exhibit this enhanced capacity to connect with the user on their terms. These platforms are unique in their missions yet they also connect with one another in ways that advance the overall utility for the user.  We would like to get a larger picture of the current work of several of these entities, their common threads, and the specific projects with which they are engaged.

The session will include the following six individuals representing research data platform products that exemplify these qualities. These include:

  • Felimon Gayanilo with WHOI's X-DOMES -  an NSF/EarthCube Project to facilitate manufacturer's support of standard metadata in describing sensors and observations across geo-science domains.
  • Rick Johnson with SHARE -  A higher education initiative to build a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle.
  • Natalie Meyers with the OSF - A scholarly commons to connect the entire research cycle.
  • Andrew Woods with Fedora - a flexible, modular, open source repository platform with native linked data support
  • Karen Hanson and Sayeed Choudhury with RMap - a project to develop mechanisms to preserve the many-to-many complex relationships among scholarly publications and their underlying data, thereby supporting the continual development of scholarly communication and digital publishing
  • Sayeed Choudhury with the Data Conservancy - building infrastructure for data curation including discovery, sharing, and enhanced preservation.

By leveraging the ways these entities work together in the user's favor, this in turn helps to solve the issue of too many disperate and unsustainable singular operations. As Simon Porter (2016) notes, system boundaries are disappearing and in its place emerges a "new research information citizenship" - one based on a network of contributors not confined to one specific system. Looking at these groups we can begin to see this emerging. The platforms and their utilities are of interest to ESIP members on several different levels. They represent some of the latest work in user-centered research data platforms and they also focus on openness, transparency, and ways to foster connections among different stakeholders and data user groups. In turn ESIP provides a unique venue for these platforms to explore new ways to work with the communities most engaged in working with multiple types of earth science data. 

The session will conclude with a discussion of gaps and the path forward.

Science, Digital; Porter, Simon (2016): Digital Science White Paper: A New ‘Research Data Mechanics’. figshare.https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.3514859.v1Retrieved: 16 56, Oct 27, 2016 (GMT)


Conveners
avatar for Reid Boehm

Reid Boehm

Data Management Consultant, JHU Data Management Services



Thursday January 12, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Oakley

4:00pm

ESIP Wiki as a Community Documentation Guidance Resource
[UPDATE] The ISO building blocks session will present a new approach for learning the ISO 19115-1 metadata model.  Traditional ISO training approaches present the metadata model from the top down, where complexity is maximized.  The building blocks approach introduces students to the standard from the bottom up, via small bite sized chunks.  These chunks are simple objects which are commonly used through out the metadata model.  While learning the ISO structure students will be simultaneously be exposed to XML, UML and XSL basics.  In this session an overview of this learning approach will be presented and illustrated with a few examples.  


Thursday January 12, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Glen Echo

5:30pm

Council for Data Facilities - Part 1

Please find the agenda for the CDF General Assembly Meeting which will take place on 12-13 January 2017 in Bethesda, Maryland.

Meeting agenda

 

Registering CDF members in RE3 (15 Min)                        Bob Arko

 

EarthCube Architecture Input by CDF (90 min)

      Summary overview of EC Architecture                     Bob Arko  

      Review of documents                                             Tim Ahern

(NOTE THE FOLLOWING LOAD SLOWLY)

                Executive Summary

                EarthCube Architecture Implementation Plan

                EarthCube Solution Architecture

 

Survey Monkey survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/EC-CDF999

CDF responses are due by January 17, 2017

Conveners

Thursday January 12, 2017 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Oakley
 
Friday, January 13
 

7:30am

Registration Opens; Continental Breakfast
Friday January 13, 2017 7:30am - 8:00am
Registration A

8:00am

Closing Plenary
This session will be streamed live and recorded to YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLKbhy8rElU

Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP


Friday January 13, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Salon E

9:00am

DKAN - The Open Data Portal built in Drupal

DKAN is an open data portal built in Drupal. DKAN is designed to be feature-compatible with CKAN, the Open Data portal built by the Open Knowledge Foundation. With DKAN, you can:

  • Easily publish datasets in key machine readable formats including JSON, XML, RDF and more
  • Share datasets through an API
  • Manage the importing of large datasets

Presentation by Andrew Hoppin, co-founder and president of NuCivic


Speakers
Conveners
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Software Developer, WHOI/BCO-DMO
Linked Data | Semantic Web | Drupal | Metadata | Marine Data


Friday January 13, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Forest Glen

9:00am

Event-Driven Virtual Collections for Community Solutions

Science data users studying specific events are often searching for multiple data sets or require many different types of data. The spatial and temporal definition of the event are used to gather data from multiple sources for an event virtual collection. Data are not limited to scientific data, but can include social media data such as videos, images, text messages and statistics of these alternate data. With this session, we aim to gather insights on using event-driven virtual collections to further community-based solutions, including event response planning, scientific research, and strengthening community resilience. This session will include discussion of virtual collection definition, data handling, and collection curation. 

In this proposed session we encourage discussions to gain insights about how event-driven virtual collections can be used to further community-based needs and solutions, to include science research, event response, and other community needs.  This information could be helpful for data centers and others to realize the value of collections of disparate data for events and other groupings.



Friday January 13, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Linden Oak

9:00am

Job Analyses of Earth Science Data Scientists
The purpose of this presentation is to provide preliminary findings of the results from interviews with scientists using the (Developing a Curriculum) DACUM approach. A DACUM is the best first step for earth science data scientists to create a list of knowledge, skills, and abilities, operationalized job descriptions, and eventually learning outcomes for use in continuing education, secondary education, and higher education. First, job incumbents know their job better than anyone else, and therefore they are the best at describing what it is that they do. Job incumbents are currently working in the field and this is especially salient for the rapidly evolving roles in data analytics and data science with external changes like technology and information policy. The second principle of the DACUM is that the best way to define a job is by describing the specific tasks that are performed on the job. Earth science data scientists, like any other intellectual work, routinely have tasks that may be difficult to describe, but those professionals who are actually performing the jobs currently should be best able to clearly explain what those tasks are in terms of task statements. Finally, the third principle of the DACUM is that all tasks performed on a job require the use of knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA) that enable successful performance of those tasks. For this DACUM, I conducted interviews with 12 earth science data scientists at the ESIP Summer Meeting 2016. The participants were asked to describe their daily/weekly/less frequent tasks, job titles, years in job and working with earth science data, credentials and degrees, other educational/training received that apply to job performance. The recorded interviews were transcribed and this presentation presents preliminary finding of the analyses. Feedback will help inform more targeted questions for a larger survey that will validate the list identified through the interviews.

Conveners

Friday January 13, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Oakley

9:00am

Towards systematically curating and integrating data product descriptive information for data users

Complete, consistent, and easy to understand information about data products is critical for meeting data discoverability, improved accessibility and usability, and interoperability requirements.

In the BigData and Open Data Era, with ever increasing variety and number of data products, it becomes increasingly impractical to do so in a manual fashion. The most effective way to ensure the completeness and quality of metadata and description documents of data products is to curate them in a systematic, consistent, and automatic fashion based on standards, community best practices, and defined frameworks.

Efforts to meeting this goal have been carried out in various disciplines and projects. This session invites presentations to describe and share their work/progress with the ESIP community on systems, tools, frameworks, workflows, etc. that enable repositories/data centers to systematically generate and provide descriptive information about the data products to data users for improved discoverability, transparency, usability, and interoperability. Additionally this session will discuss gaps that still need to be addressed.

Draft Agenda - 15 mins each (presentation + Q&A)

  • NSF/EarthCube X-DOMES (Cross-Domain Observational Metadata for Environmental Sensing) team - Gayanilo, FelimonApplication of Standards-based Description of Environmental Sensor Metadata
  • DataONE MetaDIG team - Mecum, BryceImproving Metadata with Automated Quality Evaluation 
  • NOAA OneStop Metadata Team - Zinn, SonnyDesign and implementation of automation tools for DSMM diagrams and reports
  • ESIP Documentation Cluster - TBA
  • NSF EDI (Environmental Data Initiative) -  O'Brien, Margaret: Metadata content standardiziation in the Environmental Data Initiative
  • WCRP/WDC Obs4MIPS (Observations for Model Intercomparisons Project) - Ferraro, RobertObs4MIPs - Satellite Observations Rehosted for GCM Model Evaluation

Speakers
BM

Bryce Mecum

Scientific Software Engineer, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis
MO

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, Marine Science Institute, UCSB

Conveners
avatar for Ge Peng

Ge Peng

Research Scholar, CICS-NC/NCEI
Dataset-centric scientific data stewardship, data quality management


Friday January 13, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
White Flint Amphitheater

9:00am

3rd Workshop to develop CRT (Climate Resilience Toolkit) Case Studies
This Workshop continues the theme of similar sessions at two previous ESIP meetings on CRT (Climate Resilience Toolkit) and ongoing work that could form the bases for CRT Case Studies.

Workshop agenda:

- [5 min] Introduction to the workshop, logistics, larger goal to establish a CRT pipeline at the ESIP level, etc.

- [10 min] Introduction to CRT (~2-3 slides); 5-minute Ken Burns video on story telling

- Brief description of work related to agriculture that forms the basis for a potential CRT Case Study

[15 minj] --- Ying Sun, Cornell University, Drought onset mechanisms revealed by solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF): Insights from two contrasting extreme events

The droughts of 2011 in Texas and 2012 over the central Great Plains were used as case studies, to explore the potential of satellite-observed solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) for monitoring drought dynamics. For both drought events, the spatial patterns of negative SIF anomalies from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2) closely resembled drought intensity maps from the U.S. Drought Monitor. In the Texas event, the drought-induced suppression of SIF occurred throughout 2011 but was exacerbated during the summer. This event was characterized by a persistent depletion of root-zone soil moisture caused by year-long below-normal precipitation. In contrast, in the central Great Plains event, warmer temperatures and relatively normal precipitation boosted SIF in the spring of 2012. However, a sudden drop in precipitation coupled with unusually high temperatures rapidly depleted soil moisture through evapotranspiration, leading to a rapid onset of drought in early summer. As a result, SIF reversed from above to below normal. For both event regions, the GOME-2 SIF anomalies were significantly correlated with those of root-zone soil moisture, indicating that the former could potentially be used as a proxy for the latter, for monitoring agricultural droughts with different onset mechanisms. Further analyses indicated that the contrasting dynamics of SIF during these two extreme events were caused by changes in both the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) and fluorescence yield, suggesting that satellite SIF is sensitive to both structural and physiological/biochemical variations of vegetation. We conclude that the emerging satellite SIF has excellent potential for dynamic drought monitoring.

[15 min] --- John Bolten, Associate Program Manager of Water Resources for the NASA Applied Sciences Program [TBD title]
[TBD abstract] 

[40 min] - Two concurrent breakout groups, one for each of the presenters and led by them. The groups discuss and draft the incipient stories that would become CRT Case Studies, using the CRT "templates."

[5 min] - The groups recombine and share results and thoughts.

 

Friday January 13, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Glen Echo

10:30am

Coffee Break
Friday January 13, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Foyer F-H

11:00am

Informatics in Social-Environmental Systems

Integrative research frameworks that couple disciplinary-specific, diversely sourced datasets are key for addressing complex social-environmental issues such as human well-being, climate change, and sustainable development. Working in these complex systems often requires integrating data from a variety of both earth science and social science disciplines. Too often these interdisciplinary collaborations fail to account for the informatics challenges that face researchers attempting to combine their findings. 

A major obstacle for social-environmental initiatives is integrating data that are produced by, managed by, and curated for different communities of users. This requires not only innovative methods of collaboration, but also technical infrastructures that enable data interoperability, provide consistent semantic encoding, ensure long-term access and preservation, and establish shared data governance and management protocols.

Many ESIP members understand that accounting for these types of activities is a critical component of successful long-term research cooperation. In this session we will identify key informatics challenges within social-environmental research and initiatives, and seek to draw on ESIP expertise in order to better understand how informatics aspects of social-environmental initiatives can be improved. Results from this session can help to develop a framework that incorporates informatics as a key element for achieving a truly systems and transdisciplinary perspective of social-environmental issues.

Goals of the session: (1) scope the S-E landscape: hear from people working on a variety of collaborative social-environmental systems initiatives (2) identify and synthesize key informatics challenges within S-E initiatives (3) develop or improve on a framework that incorporates informatics in S-E initiatives by drawing on ESIP knowledge and expertise (4) plan goals for S-E Informatics work after session, and situate ESIP within those goals (publication, workshops/testbed, ESIP future and collaboration with clusters, etc.)



Friday January 13, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Linden Oak

11:00am

Measuring the Value of Data

Measuring  the value of data products and services offers capabilities for stakeholders in the Earth, space, and social sciences to demonstrate how they are contributing to society. These stakeholders might include sponsors, mission operators, instrument and processing teams, and data distributors, such as digital repositories, scientific data centers, archives, and others. Unlike commercial entities, where return on investment (ROI) or profits may be used to measure value, contributions to the sciences are often conducted by non-profit organizations, including government, research, and educational institutions. Various methodologies can be utilized to demonstrate the value and document the benefits and impact of scientific data. Among other approaches, data distributors and other science stakeholders may measure impact by counts of data citations that appear in publications, users served, data products distributed, or mentions in the news or social media. Presentations in this session describe ways in which science stakeholders, including scientific data distributors, are measuring impact and assessing the value of data.

Speakers
Robert R. Downs, CIESIN, Columbia University. Measuring the Interdisciplinary Value of SEDAC Data.
Yusuke Kuwayama, Resources for the Future. Microeconomic Approaches for Quantifying the Value of Remotely Sensed Information
Robert Reining, The Mitre Corporation. Constructing NOAA's Value Tree: Representing Relationships between NOAA’s Organization, Services, and Observing Systems
Kyle Hundman, JPL, will discuss techniques for measuring online references to spacecraft missions.
Lawrence Friedl, NASA Applied Sciences Program, will share remarks to kick off the discussion. 



Friday January 13, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
White Flint Amphitheater

11:00am

Techniques for Favorable Technology Assessment and Successful Technology Infusion
What do technology users or system architects look for when assessing new tools or system components?  Once they have a cursory understanding about what the new tool or system component can do, how do they calculate the chances of that tool or component meeting their needs or integrating into their existing or developing system?  What are the communication vehicles by which users and, subsequently, decision-makers  get the information they need?  How important is the user experience with the communication vehicles (e.g., project or tool website)?  What impact does the user experience with the communication vehicles have upon successful technology infusion?  For the technology developer and the architect, are there interoperability criteria that could be used during development that would facilitate the favorable assessment  of a technology?  At what point in development should communication about the tool / component be generated to increase the changes of technology infusion?In this session, we will investigate some of the factors affecting technology assessment and technology infusion and review, and suggest, approaches that can be used by both assessors and developers to increase the success rate for use of technologies into new environments.

Speakers
Friday January 13, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Forest Glen

11:00am

UASs/Drones in Agriculture
There is a rapid emergence of new technologies in unmanned aircraft system (UAS)/drone and their applications for data collection and decision making in agriculture, in governmental organizations, academia, and the private sector. There are common issues and interests among these different user communities. These relate to collecting data for climate resilience, adaptation, and mitigation in agricultural environments, as well as to data stewardship and quailty. This session will bring together representatives from the three sectors to share experiences and potentially foster collaboration. Session agenda: - [20 min] Chris Hartman, Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore [TBD title] [TBD abstract] - [20 min] Steven Thomson, National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USDA [TBD title] [TBD abstract] - [20 min] [Tentative] Nathan Stein, senseFly [TBD title] [TBD abstract] [30 min] - Group discussion

Conveners

Friday January 13, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Salon E

11:00am

Council for Data Facilities - Part 2

Please find the agenda for the CDF General Assembly Meeting which will take place on 12-13 January 2017 in Bethesda, Maryland.

Meeting agenda

Part 2: 

Usefulness of data interchange models. (30 min)               Arlene Anderson

CDF member Activities in EarthCube  (30)                         General Discussion

Further Discussion related to Architecture (15)                   CDF members

Other Business as needed (30 min)

Conveners

Friday January 13, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Oakley

11:00am

Earth Science Data for Informing Decisions
Increasingly Earth Science observations and models are being used with other Global Change Information (GCI) to inform decisions on adapting to and mitigating global change.  Feedback from decision makers is needed so research and other activities can improve the usefulness of this GCI.  This session will provide an opportunity for the ESIP participants to share best practices and recent developments that helped improve their users’ experience with GCI.  Panelists will be introduced and will briefly discuss specific case studies of GCI use within their organization and will answer questions focused on outcomes such as: what was the intended outcome, what actually happened, what was the impact, and what should continue and what could improve the value of the GCI product or service?  Following the introductions, there will be a discussion of metrics that could be used to help GCI data providers improve the usefulness of their products and services for informing decisions, with questions and feedback from all of session participants.

Conveners

Friday January 13, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Glen Echo

12:30pm

Lunch (Boxed to go, if needed)
Friday January 13, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon F-H

12:30pm

Step inside NASA science data: virtual reality demonstration by Navteca (Lunch Demo)

Over the past year, the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) and Navteca have been exploring virtual reality (VR) technology as an approach to improving the understand of natural phenomena and physical processes. Initial demonstrations were made at the AGU conference last year and, working with Code 606, successive improvements to the functionality and depth have been made. Under an Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) contract, Navteca has developed a new VR demonstration of the three-dimensional structure of Hurricane Matthew cloud and storm systems from the Global Precipitation Model (GPM) which was demonstrated in the NASA booths at AGU Fall Meeting 2016 and at Supercomputing 2016.   

The observer interacts with and views volumetric data in an innovative way as data is rendered in real time using interactive VR hardware (headset and controllers). The user has the ability to physically move through data that is traditionally displayed as layers or slices. 

Results from displaying GPM data show that there is interesting potential for scientific visualization and analysis using VR.  We will share these results at our demonstration of GPM data in virtual reality.


Speakers
avatar for Shayna Skolnik

Shayna Skolnik

Co-founder / CEO, Navteca
Virtual reality, data visualization, science storytelling in VR, cloud computing, entrepreneurship, NASA ESTO Discover AQ project, | creativity + technology = awesome

Friday January 13, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Linden Oak
  • Collaboration Area VR/AR

12:30pm

ToolMatch Lunch Discussion
The discussions over lunch will discuss how we plan to leverage and expand the current state of our ToolMatch work to develop a system of services for discovering, downloading and transforming heterogeneous data products in an automated, cloud-based pipeline to get the data pre-analysis ready. Our approach relies on a variety of technologies to provide meaning to metadata describing the salient characteristics of data files; reasoning and querying engines to interrogate and evaluate metadata for compatibility with select data analytical services; automation of a prototype end-to-end system to facilitate data discovery, access and analysis. Besides the support given by ESIP’s Products & Services Testbed to ToolMatch, the project would leverage previous work done with ontologies and reasoning in the AIST-supported OLYMPUS project as well as work done with OPeNDAP and ArcGIS at NASA’s Atmospheric Science Data Center. We are planning to submit a proposal to that effect in the very near future, and are seeking ideas, partners, and collaborators.


Friday January 13, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Oakley

2:00pm

Explore Virtual Reality (VR) / Augmented Reality (AR)
From 3D gaming, to manufacturing, to education and beyond, Virtual Reality (VR) promises to revolutionize the way we experience the digital world. This session brings together technologists and scientists and engineers that are interested in exploring how VR and Augmented Reality (AR) can be leveraged to advance future mission planning and scientific research. We invite presentations and demonstrations that showcase innovative work in VR/AR. We will discuss and explore how these cuttingedge technologies can benefit Earth and Planetary science.

Conveners
EL

Emily Law

ESIP President - 2016


Friday January 13, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Linden Oak

2:00pm

Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) I-Frame Portals: A Lightweight Solution to Implement Customized Portals for Earth Science Data Search and Discovery
The Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) ‘i-frame’ portal solution leverages the full capabilities of the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) and GCMD keywords. This implementation is lightweight and requires minimal effort to implement as either a stand-alone portal or an ‘i-frame’ on a provider’s website. An ‘i-frame is an HTML document embedded inside another HTML document on a website. A portal is a virtual subset of the directory with a focused view (based on a specific science discipline) for organizations to maintain and document their metadata. Portals can be customized and configured based on a pre-defined query (e.g. json={"condition":{"project":"ESIP"}}). A demonstration of the portal capabilities will be given and attendees interested in utilizing the portal solution  can provide a  query so portals can be created on the spot.

Draft Presentation Outline:


  • Overview and Purpose of GCMD Portals

  • What It Takes To Make a Useful Portal

  • Capabilities of the I-Frame Portal Implementation

  • How Metadata Providers Can Use the I-Frame Portal

  • Demo of How to Create an I-Frame Portal


Conveners
avatar for Tyler Stevens

Tyler Stevens

Science Coordinator, GCMD


Friday January 13, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
White Flint Amphitheater

2:00pm

OneStop Usability Testing

The OneStop Project: Usability Testing

In response to the President’s Open Government Initiative and related policies, NOAA has committed to providing improved public access to all of its environmental information to enable research and commercial innovation through ease of data discovery and use. The OneStop Project supports NOAA's efforts by leveraging existing access technologies and infusing specific innovations to provide improved discovery, access, and visualization services for NOAA’s data.  OneStop is viewed as a pathfinder effort with an initial focus on selected high-priority datasets from NCEI, but eventually scalable across NOAA’s data.  OneStop is a key implementation agent for the USGEO Common Framework for Earth Observation Data within NOAA.  

In Dec 2016, the OneStop project is releasing a Beta version of its data discovery interface and invites the ESIP community to provide feedback in advance of the first full release later in the spring of 2017.  Both script-based, human-observed testing and "freeform", on-your-own style testing with feedback provided via a form will be offered to the ESIP community and beyond during this beta review period.  

Notes: 

OneStop Usability Testing

The OneStop project would like to host some form of usability testing of the OneStop user interface, which will have released its Beta for public review and testing just a few weeks before the meeting, in Dec 2016. Perhaps more effective than a breakout session, or at least coupled with a dedicated breakout session, would be a table/stand in tthe hallway that we would staff and conduct testing all week of the EDM/ESIP meetings.  Please advise on how to proceed with something like this idea.

Thanks!
Ken


Speakers
Friday January 13, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Forest Glen

2:00pm

Tools and Technologies for Big Data in Earth Science
The field of earth and environmental sciences is rapidly adopting the paradigm of large-scale, data-intensive analytics to understand our complex and an ever changing planet. Advances in sensing technologies, modeling, and simulation, data storage, compute capabilities, and sophisticated software has increased the size, complexity, and variety of data. To this end researchers are working on solutions that uses proven and sometimes cutting-edge tools for data intensive earth science analytics. In this session, we will present some of the recent work that uses Jupyter, Spark, Scala, and Docker, and SciDB to address some of these challenges in an open-source enviroment.

Speakers
DD

Dan Duffy

Dr. Dan Duffy is head of the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS, Code 606.2), which provides high performance computing, storage, networking, and data systems designed to meet the specialized needs of the Earth science modeling communities. He has worked on a number of applied research and development projects to explore technologies for the next generation of high performance computing solutions for NASA scientists, including being the... Read More →

Conveners
avatar for Aashish Chaudhary

Aashish Chaudhary

Kitware Inc., Kitware Inc.


Friday January 13, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Glen Echo

2:00pm

Getting Past Jargon in Communication

"You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

Communication is not always easy, particularly once jargon starts. In 2011, Somerville and Hassol(1) published a list of terms that have different meanings for scientists and the public. AGU has built on that initial list as well. These lists are a good start for scientists who want to better communicate with the public, but it is not complete. It also doesn’t address the challenges that scientists can have when speaking to other scientists outside of their specific discipline.

This session is meant to introduce the concept behind a “science communication thesaurus” building upon the work of Somerville and Hassol. We envision this thesaurus to have multiple parts addressing communication challenges around specific terms both between domains and between scientists and the public. We welcome anecdotes of successful and unsuccessful communications as we work to improve how we convey our research to others.

(1) Somerville, R.C.J., and Hassol, S.J., 2011. Communicating the science of climate change, Physics Today, 64(10), p. 48-53. doi:10.1063/PT.3.1296


Conveners
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information


Friday January 13, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Oakley

2:00pm

Reeling in the biologists: connecting the dots between observers, integrators, and decision makers

Our life on Earth depends on a healthy balance of other types of life and whether we can use living and non-living resources in a sustainable manner into the future. One of the big challenges of our time is to characterize the diversity of life on Earth and measure how it is changing as this is a fundamental requirement to sustain our use of resources while the earth’s climate is changing at the same time. This requires not only updating the framework, architecture, and interoperability of national and international databases to include measures of the diversity of life around us but also making the analyses associated with those measures more transparent and computationally-enabled.

Analyses such as biodiversity indicators and better predictive capabilities are imperative for understanding and taking action to support biodiversity. These indicators and predictive capabilities need to be incorporated into products that decision makers can readily make use of. However it is not enough to simply make these predictions, we also need to unlock the black box around the workflows that are the basis for these indicators and predictions.

We invite biologists and those associated with curating and analyzing biological data to join us to present and discuss strategies for new products for decision makers that require biodiversity data in its broadest sense. We will explore in more detail connections between groups such as:

The Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) works to bring together legacy data while collecting new observational data to improve our understanding of changes and connections between marine biodiversity and ecosystem function.

The Marine Biodiversity Virtual Laboratory (MBVL) looks to address multi-scale, heterogeneous data challenges with informatics solutions that enable the cyber-generation and documentation of biodiversity indicators, providing the traceability between data and information to be used as a basis for sustainable ecosystem-based management and needed policy decisions.

The Ocean Biogeographic Information System-USA (OBIS-USA) integrates marine observation data from multiple data providers using the Darwin Core data standard and provides those data up to the international community through the International Ocean Biogeographic System and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility.

The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) has been working with the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) and OBIS-USA to standardize biological datasets for use in ERDDAP Servers and ingestion by OBIS-USA.

The objective is to identify areas of common interest and trace a path from observations to integrated data that can be incorporated into indicators and predictions within an open science framework to enable a revolution in science-based decision-making.


Conveners

Friday January 13, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Salon E

3:30pm

End of Meeting
Friday January 13, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Foyer F-H